Norfolk, Virginia: “Died While Seeking Relief”(1901)

Main entrance, Calvary Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia. Photo: Nadia K. Orton, 2012. All rights reserved.

On a formerly unknown burial in Calvary Cemetery…

“A Colored Man Who Was Very Ill Dies in the Office of Dr. L. C. Shepherd

An old colored man staggered into the office of Dr. L. C. Shepherd, in Freemason street, about 7 o’clock Sunday evening. The man said his home was in Princess Anne avenue, but before he could give his name, he died.1

Norfolk, Virginia: Revelations at West Point Cemetery (1827)

West Point Cemetery, Norfolk, Virginia. Photo: Nadia K. Orton, 2012. All rights reserved.

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Voices of Liberation and Freedom: The Fall of Richmond, April 3rd, 1865

Richmond, the Confederate capital, entered by the Union army. nypl.org https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-ff22-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Today is the 153rd anniversary of the liberation of Richmond, Virginia, by Union forces during America’s Civil War, 1861-1865. The first soldiers to enter Richmond were the “colored” regiments of the Union Army, ranks formed of free and formerly enslaved African-Americans.

Our own ancestors were a part of this collective sacrifice and struggle for freedom, escaping slavery where they were held in bondage, and serving with the 1st, 2nd, 10th, 36th, and 37th Regiments of the United States Colored Infantry, the 1st and 2nd Regiments of the United States Colored Cavalry, and as domestics, laundresses, and messengers in and around Union camps and hospitals. This post reflects just a few of the sites I’ve visited over the years that chronicle the long road to freedom.